USC Dornsife College Of Letters Arts and Sciences

University of Southern California

The Black Church Next: Challenges and Opportunities Facing African American Congregations in 21st Century Los Angeles

The Black Church Next: Challenges and Opportunities Facing African American Congregations in 21st Century Los Angeles

CRCC released “The Black Church Next: Challenges and Opportunities Facing African American Congregations in 21st Century Los Angeles,” by Research Associate Dr. Daniel E. Walker, who looks at the state of the Black Church in the report.

From the report:

Using the city of Los Angeles as its target, this report hopes to bring into focus a set of finite questions in order to shine a light on some of the challenges and opportunities facing the Black Church in the city and across the nation. Given the high rate of religious participation among African Americans and the city’s status as the nation’s second largest metropolitan area, observations regarding the Black Church in Los Angeles hold the promise of impacting strategies of religious organization and social engagement nationally.

Highlights of the report include:

  • How the economic downturn and housing crisis of its patrons are affecting the Black Church.
  • The Church’s role in the changing attitudes toward marriage and the Latino community.
  • The united use of social media in the 2008 presidential election and the influence of Barrack Obama as a faith leader.

Dr. Walker is also the board chair of the BLU Educational Foundation, and the president/CEO of Perfect Works, a consulting firm that uses history, faith, education, and the arts to bring progressive change to the world. He is the author of the critically acclaimed book No More, No More Slavery and Cultural Resistance in Havana and New Orleans (University of Minnesota Press) and the founding director of the Gospel Music History Project and the Gospel Music History Archive at the USC Libraries.

 

Download a PDF of the Report 

 

Daniel Walker is a guest contributor with the USC Center for Religion and Civic Culture.